Sheena Medina

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Nerd Alert: New York city just scored it’s very own Museum of Math. Here’s a nice roundup on what to do, hear, and see there via timeoutnewyork. I think one of the best features will be the museum’s free monthly lecture series taking place on the first Wednesday of each month. 
On January 2, mathematician Amy Langville will explain the science behind search-engine rankings. My first questions to Amy will be: Why are there 32,200 results to a search for “Amy Langville” on Google? And Why is your resume 5 pages long with no pictures? 
I look forward to this.
via TONY

Nerd Alert: New York city just scored it’s very own Museum of Math. Here’s a nice roundup on what to do, hear, and see there via timeoutnewyork. I think one of the best features will be the museum’s free monthly lecture series taking place on the first Wednesday of each month.

On January 2, mathematician Amy Langville will explain the science behind search-engine rankings. My first questions to Amy will be: Why are there 32,200 results to a search for “Amy Langville” on Google? And Why is your resume 5 pages long with no pictures? 

I look forward to this.

via TONY

Jared Leto stopped by the Fast Company office today to chat with readers about his approach to disrupting the music industry, overcoming challenges, and dealing with enemies. I sat off to the side tweeting the S#IT out of it for @FastComapny. Afterwords he graciously let me take a picture with him!

He also had some very smart and inspirational things to say. My favorite line:

Being surrounded by dreamers and believers certainly helps make the impossible much more impossible.” 

You should read the full transcript from today’s chat.

I love you Amit! You’re in my thoughts constantly.
superamit:

Many of you have asked, so here’s what’s going on with me.
WHAT HAPPENED BEFORE
8/1979: Born. Grew up in CT, built a killer eraser collection, fell in love with computers.
Left college to start a company. Fell hard. Fled to India for 3 months.
Started 2nd company. Learned to be an adult. Fell in love with NYC.
Moved to SF, discovered burritos & some of my fave people on Earth.
9/2011: Got diagnosed with Leukemia!
Cried. Went through 3 cycles of chemo. Hurt. Thought hard about what I want out of life. Grew up a second time.
TODAY
… After over 100 drives organized by friends, family, and strangers, celebrity call-outs, a bazillion reblogs (7000+!), tweets, and Facebook posts, press, fundraising and international drives organized by tireless friends, and a couple painful false starts, I’ve got a 10/10 matched donor!
You all literally helped save my life. (And the lives of many others.)
WHAT HAPPENS NEXT
Tomorrow, I’ll be admitted to Dana Farber in Boston for 4-5 weeks.
First I’ll get a second Hickman line to allow direct access to my heart (for meds and for nutrients if I’m not able to eat). Over the next week, the docs blast my body with a stiff chemo cocktail to try and eradicate all traces of cancer cells. In the process, the immune system I was born with, and my body’s ability to make blood, are destroyed.
Next Friday, I get my donor’s stem cells by IV. I start on immunosuppressants to prevent my body from rejecting them (I’ll be on them for 12-18 months). For these weeks I’ve no immune system, so I’m severely vulnerable to viruses and bacteria. My hospital room and hallway become my world.
Meanwhile, the stem cells make their way to my bone marrow and, with some luck, start producing platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells. At this point, my blood type changes to the blood type of my donor. And my blood will now have my donor’s DNA, not my own.
This is science fiction stuff. I can hardly believe it’s even possible, and there’s lots of chances for things to go wrong. It’s frightening.
AFTER THE TRANSPLANT
Recovery to a new state of “normal” takes about a year, but there’s a few storm clouds hovering:
My immune system is new, like a baby’s. I’m prone to getting sick.
Just as with any organ transplant, there’s a chance of rejection. Except in this case, it’s my blood that’s the foreign body, and it touches every organ. They call it graft-vs-host-disease and it can cause health issues and organ complications for the rest of my life.
Successful transplant or not, Leukemia can relapse. Stubborn mofo.
Overall, 75% of AML transplant patients survive year one, 50% make it through year five. My odds are a little better since I’m young.
THE GREAT NEWS
I’ve got a long road ahead. But I’ve got a donor & amazing family & friends. A few months ago I didn’t have many options. Today I have a plan.
I am alive. I start tomorrow. Wish me luck!
Thank you.

I love you Amit! You’re in my thoughts constantly.

superamit:

Many of you have asked, so here’s what’s going on with me.

WHAT HAPPENED BEFORE

  • 8/1979: Born. Grew up in CT, built a killer eraser collection, fell in love with computers.
  • Left college to start a company. Fell hard. Fled to India for 3 months.
  • Started 2nd company. Learned to be an adult. Fell in love with NYC.
  • Moved to SF, discovered burritos & some of my fave people on Earth.
  • 9/2011: Got diagnosed with Leukemia!
  • Cried. Went through 3 cycles of chemo. Hurt. Thought hard about what I want out of life. Grew up a second time.

TODAY

… After over 100 drives organized by friends, family, and strangers, celebrity call-outs, a bazillion reblogs (7000+!), tweets, and Facebook posts, press, fundraising and international drives organized by tireless friends, and a couple painful false starts, I’ve got a 10/10 matched donor!

You all literally helped save my life. (And the lives of many others.)

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT

Tomorrow, I’ll be admitted to Dana Farber in Boston for 4-5 weeks.

First I’ll get a second Hickman line to allow direct access to my heart (for meds and for nutrients if I’m not able to eat). Over the next week, the docs blast my body with a stiff chemo cocktail to try and eradicate all traces of cancer cells. In the process, the immune system I was born with, and my body’s ability to make blood, are destroyed.

Next Friday, I get my donor’s stem cells by IV. I start on immunosuppressants to prevent my body from rejecting them (I’ll be on them for 12-18 months). For these weeks I’ve no immune system, so I’m severely vulnerable to viruses and bacteria. My hospital room and hallway become my world.

Meanwhile, the stem cells make their way to my bone marrow and, with some luck, start producing platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells. At this point, my blood type changes to the blood type of my donor. And my blood will now have my donor’s DNA, not my own.

This is science fiction stuff. I can hardly believe it’s even possible, and there’s lots of chances for things to go wrong. It’s frightening.

AFTER THE TRANSPLANT

Recovery to a new state of “normal” takes about a year, but there’s a few storm clouds hovering:

  • My immune system is new, like a baby’s. I’m prone to getting sick.
  • Just as with any organ transplant, there’s a chance of rejection. Except in this case, it’s my blood that’s the foreign body, and it touches every organ. They call it graft-vs-host-disease and it can cause health issues and organ complications for the rest of my life.
  • Successful transplant or not, Leukemia can relapse. Stubborn mofo.

Overall, 75% of AML transplant patients survive year one, 50% make it through year five. My odds are a little better since I’m young.

THE GREAT NEWS

I’ve got a long road ahead. But I’ve got a donor & amazing family & friends. A few months ago I didn’t have many options. Today I have a plan.

I am alive. I start tomorrow. Wish me luck!

Thank you.

I… I just need this. Immediately. That is all.
superamit:

nevver:

Pack your sandwich

I refuse to travel until someone buys me or makes me this suitcase.

I… I just need this. Immediately. That is all.

superamit:

nevver:

Pack your sandwich

I refuse to travel until someone buys me or makes me this suitcase.

fastcompany:


Saul Bass. Before I ever met him, before we worked together, he was a  legend in my eyes. His designs, for film titles and company logos and  record albums and posters, defined an era.

- Martin Scorsese zooms in on what made legendary designer Saul Bass great.

fastcompany:

Saul Bass. Before I ever met him, before we worked together, he was a legend in my eyes. His designs, for film titles and company logos and record albums and posters, defined an era.

- Martin Scorsese zooms in on what made legendary designer Saul Bass great.

(Source: , via fastcompany)

YES! I quote this line All. The. Time.
nprfreshair:

mermaidsgrave:

…

Monday, Seth MacFarlane slips into Stewie’s voice….on Fresh Air.

YES! I quote this line All. The. Time.

nprfreshair:

mermaidsgrave:

Monday, Seth MacFarlane slips into Stewie’s voice….on Fresh Air.

While we remember those that have fallen it is also comforting, in a way, to remember that we all fall down.

Track- We All Fall Down by Matthew Santos Feat. L. Subramaniam

(Recorded in 2009. Never released)

I JUST had a conversation about this cartoon with some friends in Providence. We didn’t discuss the social context, but it’s something that should be considered when watching and enjoying. Read below and then watch the whole thing here!
illbedancingwithmyself:

note-a-bear:

BWAH!
Okay, so I keep meaning to look for this semi-rant I wrote about this cartoon ages ago.
The main thing is:
This is a cartoon in blackface, seriously
By which I mean, it’s based on Al Jolson, famed jazz singer and blackface performer from the 30s (this character is named Owl Jolson)
More specifically this cartoon is based on his film The Jazz Singer, in which his climactic reconciliation of his background as a Hasidic Jew and jazz/blackface performer comes about with him in blackface
This whole narrative plays into a dual role of Jews as the “new Blacks” or the “N——- of Europe” at the turn of the last century (though European anti-Semitism has a long history) and their role in US minstrelsy/proliferation of white jazz performance in the first part of the 20th century. 
Don’t get me wrong, I love this cartoon, and I used to watch it all the time on the Tex Avery show and Toon Heads back when Cartoon Network played old cartoons all the time. It’s not a bad cartoon, and it’s one of the top examples of the role cartoons had in expanding the listenership of jazz. But it is a very interesting example of just how insidious blackface was and on how many levels it was applied.

I JUST had a conversation about this cartoon with some friends in Providence. We didn’t discuss the social context, but it’s something that should be considered when watching and enjoying. Read below and then watch the whole thing here!

illbedancingwithmyself:

note-a-bear:

BWAH!

Okay, so I keep meaning to look for this semi-rant I wrote about this cartoon ages ago.

The main thing is:

  1. This is a cartoon in blackface, seriously
  2. By which I mean, it’s based on Al Jolson, famed jazz singer and blackface performer from the 30s (this character is named Owl Jolson)
  3. More specifically this cartoon is based on his film The Jazz Singer, in which his climactic reconciliation of his background as a Hasidic Jew and jazz/blackface performer comes about with him in blackface
  4. This whole narrative plays into a dual role of Jews as the “new Blacks” or the “N——- of Europe” at the turn of the last century (though European anti-Semitism has a long history) and their role in US minstrelsy/proliferation of white jazz performance in the first part of the 20th century.

Don’t get me wrong, I love this cartoon, and I used to watch it all the time on the Tex Avery show and Toon Heads back when Cartoon Network played old cartoons all the time. It’s not a bad cartoon, and it’s one of the top examples of the role cartoons had in expanding the listenership of jazz. But it is a very interesting example of just how insidious blackface was and on how many levels it was applied.

(Source: gandalfthablack, via russmarshalek)

I don’t even eat pork and I want this. 
themattsmith:

Tonight’s tacos:  Tinga (shredded slow-cooked pork), queso fresco, cilantro, avocado and pineapple
Tinga

2 pounds  boneless pork butt , trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1-inch pieces 


2 medium  onions , 1 quartered and 1 chopped fine


5 medium  garlic cloves , 3 peeled and smashed and 2 minced or pressed through garlic press (about 2 teaspoons)


4 sprigs  fresh thyme 


   Table salt 


2 tablespoons  olive oil 


1/2 teaspoon  dried oregano


1 (14.5-ounce) can tomato sauce


1 tablespoon ground chipotle powder (see note)


2 bay leaves

 

INSTRUCTIONS



1. Bring pork, quartered onion, smashed garlic cloves, thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and 6 cups water to simmer in large saucepan over medium-high heat, skimming off any foam that rises to surface. Reduce heat to medium-low, partially cover, and cook until pork is tender, 75 to 90 minutes. Drain pork, reserving 1 cup cooking liquid. Discard onion, garlic, and thyme. Return pork to saucepan and, using potato masher, mash until shredded into rough ½-inch pieces (see Step-by-Step below); set aside.




2. Heat olive oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add shredded pork, chopped onion, and oregano; cook, stirring often, until pork is well browned and crisp, 7 to 10 minutes. Add minced garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds.




3. Stir in tomato sauce, chipotle powder, reserved pork cooking liquid, and bay leaves; simmer until almost all liquid has evaporated, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove and discard bay leaves and season with salt to taste.
recipe via America’s Test Kitchen

I don’t even eat pork and I want this. 

themattsmith:

Tonight’s tacos:  Tinga (shredded slow-cooked pork), queso fresco, cilantro, avocado and pineapple

Tinga

  • pounds  boneless pork butt , trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1-inch pieces 
  • medium  onions , 1 quartered and 1 chopped fine
  • medium  garlic cloves , 3 peeled and smashed and 2 minced or pressed through garlic press (about 2 teaspoons)
  • sprigs  fresh thyme 
  •    Table salt 
  • tablespoons  olive oil 
  • 1/2 teaspoon  dried oregano
  • (14.5-ounce) can tomato sauce
  • tablespoon ground chipotle powder (see note)
  • bay leaves

INSTRUCTIONS
  • 1. Bring pork, quartered onion, smashed garlic cloves, thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and 6 cups water to simmer in large saucepan over medium-high heat, skimming off any foam that rises to surface. Reduce heat to medium-low, partially cover, and cook until pork is tender, 75 to 90 minutes. Drain pork, reserving 1 cup cooking liquid. Discard onion, garlic, and thyme. Return pork to saucepan and, using potato masher, mash until shredded into rough ½-inch pieces (see Step-by-Step below); set aside.

  • 2. Heat olive oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add shredded pork, chopped onion, and oregano; cook, stirring often, until pork is well browned and crisp, 7 to 10 minutes. Add minced garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

  • 3. Stir in tomato sauce, chipotle powder, reserved pork cooking liquid, and bay leaves; simmer until almost all liquid has evaporated, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove and discard bay leaves and season with salt to taste.

    recipe via America’s Test Kitchen